April 28, 2022

Only Dull People Are Brilliant At Breakfast

I made 38 highlights while reading Only Dull People Are Brilliant At Breakfast by Oscar Wilde. The book will give you insights into living with zest.
  • The supreme object of life is to live. Few people live. It is true life only to realise one's perfection, to make one's every dream a reality.

  • I have always believed that consistency is the last refuge of the unimaginative.

  • What is the good of friendship if one cannot say what one means? Anybody can say charming things and try to please and flatter, but a true friend always says unpleasant things and does not mind giving pain. Indeed, if he is a true friend, he prefers it, for he knows he is doing good.

  • I have always believed that hard work is simply the refuge of people who have nothing whatever to do.

  • It is always a silly thing to give advice, but to give good advice is fatal. I hope you will never fall into that error. If you do, you will be sorry for it.

  • You forget that a thing is not necessarily true because a man dies for it.

  • A critic should get taught to criticise a work of art without referencing the author's personality. That is the beginning of criticism.

  • Education is an admirable thing. But it is good to remember that nothing worth knowing can get taught from time to time.

  • A conversation should touch everything but should concentrate on nothing.

  • There is no such thing as a moral or an immoral book. Books are well written or poorly written. That is all.

  • Anybody can sympathise with the sufferings of a friend, but it requires a fine nature - the nature of a true individualist - to sympathise with a friend's success.

  • Art is the only serious thing in the world. And the artist is the only person who is never serious.

  • Pleasure is the only thing one should live for. Nothing ages like happiness.

  • The old believe everything: the middle-aged suspect everything: the young know everything.

  • After the first glass, you see things as you wish they were. After the second, you see things as they are not. Finally, you see things as they are, which is the most horrible thing in the world.

  • Ultimately the bond of all companionship, whether in marriage or friendship, is conversation.

  • Praise makes me humble, but I know I have touched the stars when abused.

  • I have the simplest tastes. I am always satisfied with the best.

  • No great artist ever sees things as they are. If he did, he would cease to be an artist.

  • To recommend thrift to the poor is both grotesque and insulting. It is like advising a man who is starving to eat less.

  • A conversation is one of the loveliest of arts.

  • It is only the intellectually lost who ever argue.

  • I never approve or disapprove of anything now. It is an absurd attitude to take towards life. We are not sent into the world to air our moral prejudices.

  • No man dies for what he knows to be true. Men die for what they want to be true, for what some terror in their hearts tells them is not true.

  • Society often forgives the criminal; it never forgives the dreamer.

  • We teach people how to remember. We never teach them how to grow.

  • In the summer term, Oxford teaches the exquisite art of idleness, one of the most important things any University can teach.

  • Laughter is not a bad beginning for a friendship, and it is by far the best ending for one.

  • History never repeats itself. The historians repeat each other.

  • To do nothing is the most difficult thing in the world, the most difficult and the most intellectual.

  • The aim of life is self-development. To realise one's nature perfectly - that is what each of us is here for.

  • The one charm of marriage is that it makes a life of deception necessary for both parties.

  • To live in happiness, you must know some unhappiness in life.

  • If nature had been comfortable, mankind would never have invented architecture.

  • Of course, I plagiarise. It is the privilege of the appreciative man.

  • It is only the unimaginative who invents. The true artist is known by the use he makes of what he annexes - and he annexes everything.

  • I adore simple pleasures. They are the last refuge of the complex.

  • It is personalities, not principles, that move the age.